Pay check: How much do these world leaders earn?

World Leader

Have you ever wondered how much money the top leaders of some of the world’s leading nations earn annually? Here’s a list of the most recent official data (as of September, 2016) of the yearly earnings of these world leaders.

* All figures in US dollars.

World Leader
Xi Jinping, President, People’s Republic of China
Salary: $20,600

 


World Leader
Narendra Modi, Prime Minister, India
Salary: $28,800

 


World Leader
Matteo Renzi, Prime Minister, Italy
Salary: $120,000

 


World Leader
Vladimir Putin, President, Russia
Salary: $137,650

 


World Leader
Theresa May, Prime Minister, UK
Salary: $186,119

 


World Leader
François Hollande, President, France
Salary: $198,700

 


World Leader
Jacob Zuma, President, South Africa
Salary: $206,600

 


World Leader
Shinzo Abe, Prime Minister, Japan
Salary: $241,250

 


World Leader
Angela Merkel, Chancellor, Germany
Salary: $242,000

 


World Leader
Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister, Canada
Salary: $260,000

 


World Leader
Barack Obama, President, USA
Salary: $400,000

– All figures according to official data compiled by CNN

Originally at http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/savingandinvesting/pay-check-how-much-do-these-world-leaders-earn/ss-AAawHzo#image=1

 

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Sat 15 Oct 16

Would Warren Buffett buy the iPhone 7? Probably not.

Here is why Warren Buffett will not buy iPhone 7

His company Berkshire Hathaway recently bought $1 billion worth of Apple stock. However, as per reports, the decision to invest was made by one of Buffett’s lieutenants, and not by the billionaire investor himself.

Buffett is known for being averse to investing in technology companies but his fund managers are reported to take their own calls.

What is more, Buffett’s last known cell phone is a flip phone, which he displayed in an interview to a TV channel in 2013.

Marked down

Buffett has been quoted as saying: "’Price is what you pay; value is what you get. Whether we’re talking about socks or stocks, I like buying quality merchandise when it is marked down." Clearly value for money is Buffett’s motto and the iPhone 7 is definitely not ‘marked down’.

Further, Buffett does not feel that great businesses should be bought at any price.

‘Great’ phone at a high price

He has been further quoted as saying: "For the investor, a too-high purchase price for the stock of an excellent company can undo the effects of a subsequent decade of favourable business developments."

So should you be buying a ‘great’ phone at a high price?

Comfort for a year

With Rs 60,000, the starting price of iPhone 7, you could do a lot of other things such as running your room and/or car air-conditioner the entire summer without stinging. You could buy comfort for the entire year depending on your usage.

Depreciation

You could invest the amount in a tax saving instrument under Section 80C and get tax relief equal to a maximum of 30 per cent of Rs 60,000 if you are in the 30% tax bracket. This way you would be getting returns on your money plus saving tax.

High-end electronic gadgets depreciate the fastest. In a few years time this model would be half obsolete. So look at buying it only if you just can’t do without the unique features offered by the iPhone 7. Ponder some more of Warren’s wisdom: "If you buy things you do not need, soon you will have to sell things you need."

If you are looking at getting value for money check the market for other phones which offer good features at lower prices.

Finally, if you do decide to go for the iPhone 7 it would be advisable to insure it immediately after purchase and enable anti-theft mechanisms/apps.

Originally at

http://m.economictimes.com/slideshows/investments-markets/would-warren-buffett-buy-the-iphone-7-probably-not/great-phone-at-a-high-price/slideshow/54272110.cms

Beware: 7 retailer tricks that make you spend more

If you are planning a shopping binge this festive season—online or offline—make sure you don’t fall prey to these retailer tricks.

Decoy Pricing

This tactic is used by many stores.

If a product worth Rs 1,000 is placed next to those worth Rs 500 and Rs 1,100, you are likely to pick the Rs 1,000 product and think of it as a good deal.

It’s a diversion to make the costly items seem economical. It’s also used in restaurants, where menus list high cost items next to cheaper ones.

Open the Wallet

At the checkout counter, have you noticed small items like low-priced wallets, accessories, snacks and chocolates?

They are there for a reason. After an exhaustive shopping session, you are an easy prey with little self-control. So you will easily succumb to chocolates and small items.

Downloading Apps

How many e-commerce apps have you downloaded on your phone?

Even if you are not an avid shopper, you may succumb to regular alerts and messages of early-bird notices and buy things just because they are on sale or make impulse purchases for items that you don’t really need.

Free Samples

The free sample stations strategically placed in malls and grocery stores are not just a marketing strategy for a new product or eatable, but are also intended to make you linger around and buy other items placed in the area or aisles positioned next to these stations.

Mesh Bags Costlier

Did you think the vegetables packed in mesh bags were for your ease of picking and carrying?

Not always. They are costlier than loose items, and may also be a mix of good and damaged items.

So it may be more cost-effective to spend five more minutes and pick the vegetables by hand.

Small Packages Sell Big

If you think you are saving money by buying items that come in packs, say, a six-pack of juice cartons or probiotic packs, think again.

Research shows that you invariably end up consuming more over time, a smart way to make you spend more each time.

So unless you are entertaining or planning a trip, try not to go in for the ‘economical’ packs.

Discount Traps

‘Buy one, get second at ’50 per cent’ or ‘Buy one, get one free’ don’t make for good offers.

The first one is only providing a 25 per cent discount on each item. In the latter, the price may cover both items.

Online sales may also offer discounts with limited validity or on the next purchase.

Originally at http://m.economictimes.com/slideshows/investments-markets/beware-7-retailer-tricks-that-make-you-spend-more/discount-traps/slideshow/54386057.cms